HANABI
はなび

1. (n) fireworks

FUN FACTS

Japanese fireworks contents are environmentally friendly and naturally-derived materials.

Fireworks does not employ potassium dichromate (which has a negative impact on the environment!)

The blend of materials for Japanese fireworks are carefully calculated, to reduce smoke compared to fireworks produced in other countries.

Casing around the firework shells and its content are made of paper: no plastic is being used.

The techniques used to fire Japanese fireworks are highly advanced: almost entirely eliminating the possibility of misfiring. In the unlikely event of an unfired firework, it’ll descent back to ground safely.

The higher the density of the fireworks, the more impact it will give and the more magnificent it will be.

Fireworks are multi-core: it consists of multiple layers.

Fireworks are able to shaped in many forms, such as hearts and characters.

WABI

Ignited from charcoal, it produces a dark colour and blooms in long tails. Typically used to frame the POKA (Youbi) fireworks.

POKA (YOUBI)

Small but highest in colour intensity to showcase a myriad of colourful blooms!

SHIRO TENMETSU

Flashes in blinks of white

NISHIKI KAMURO

The sparks of gold are long and trickle down slowly. It’s commonly used for Grand Finales at the Natsu Matsuri (Summer Festivals) in Japan.

MANGEKYOU

(Kaleidoscope)

Blooms from a collected centre of numerous light streaks. Produced from a combination of YOUBI and TENMETSU fireworks.

KIN YANAGI

A brother of the POKA fireworks, while it does not bloom large, the golden sparks trickle down slowly and gracefully.

MIZUIRO BOTAN

(Water Coloured Peonies)

Blooms to the likeness of a peony, delicate and with short tails

 

GIN KAMURO

The silver sparks trickle down long and slowly